Video: How to Set Sag on your Motorcycle Shocks

Posted by on May 26, 2016 in Bikes, Product, Technical, Video | 2 comments

Screen Shot 2016-05-26 at 10.59.39 AMWe updated our video on how to set sag on your motorcycle’s shocks. You might be asking yourself, “What is setting Sag? and why is that important to me?” The bottom line is if you want to get the maximum comfort, performance, and efficiency out of your shocks, you’re going to want to set the sag and by the time you’re done adjusting, have about 3/4″ of sag between having the rider (you) standing above the bike and then sitting (so that the shocks are compressed). For a more detailed set of instructions check out the video here on our youtube channel or for a less visual approach, read our written instructions below!

 

How to set sag on your motorcycle:

1 The proper pre-load setting will allow the rear suspension to sag, or compress, approximately ¾” when loaded.

2 To check sag, take a measurement from the center of the rear axle, straight up to a vertical point on the rear fender or frame with the unloaded rider off the bike.

3 Then, take a second measurement using the same loaded points with the rider(s) sitting on the bike.

4 The difference between the two measurements is the ride sag.

5 If the bike is sagging too much, increase the pre-load to the suggested amount of sag.

6 Spring pre-load adjustments are made by turning the Upper Cover on the shock.

7 Turn this adjuster clockwise to increase spring pre-load (make spring stiffer) and counterclockwise to decrease spring pre-load (make spring softer).

8 Set the pre-load equally on both shocks using these reference marks as your guide.

2 Comments

  1. I have 944’s on my ’08 Road King and they are too stiff, there is no sag and they are on the “softess” setting. can I purchase just the standard springs an put them on my shocks?

    • Hey Steve, we should definitely be able to help you out with that! Feel free to contact us directly at: info@progressivesuspension.com or our tech line: 714-523-8700.

      Thanks,
      Progressive Suspension